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Frequently Asked Questions

Resource Library › Frequently Asked Questions

Becoming a Donor

 
Opening a Fund

How do I open a fund?

Creating a fund is simple and fast. You can initiate the process of opening a donor-advised fund by completing and returning a New Fund Worksheet, which can be found on this page.

While there is no minimum opening gift, the annual fee for a donor-advised fund is 0.5% of assets, with an annual minimum of $500.

You may claim a charitable deduction for the full amount of the gift (for outright gifts) in the year of each contribution. You can make additional contributions to the fund in any amount at any time. Others can also make contributions to your fund, perhaps to mark a special occasion or support a special project that interests you.

For more Information about starting a fund, contact Alexandra Derby, vice president for Philanthropic Services, at 415.464.2517 or by email; or Brian Van Weele, director of philanthropic planning, at 415.464.2515 or by email.

Who can make grants?

Throughout your lifetime, or until you resign, you advise on the grantmaking activities of the fund. However, alternatively, you may choose to designate your spouse or partner, your child, or another member of your family or a friend as an advisor to your fund.

Can my kids make grants too?

Yes, you can do this by naming them as successors to your fund. Usually, one generation is named a successor. However, call us to discuss your particular family situation. If you do not name a successor, or after your successors' death or resignation, the Foundation's Board of Trustees will make these grants from your fund in accordance with your wishes.

What can I name my fund?

Most Donors use their family name for their fund, which appears in Foundation publications, such as the annual report. Or, you may choose a name that is representative of the types of programs you want to support. Or, you may choose a name for the fund that guarantees your anonymity.

What are my investment options?

To meet their philanthropic objectives, donors may suggest that their fund’s assets be invested in any proportion in six investment pools: an equity pool, a socially screened equity pool, a fixed income pool, a money market pool, an enhanced cash pool, and the Foundation's Loan Fund, which makes below-market loans to Marin nonprofits. For no risk to principal, funds are generally invested solely in the money market pool. Endowed funds, which are intended to maintain purchasing power over time, typically allocate 65% of assets to either of the equity pools and 35% to the fixed income pool.

Within each pool (except the Marin Community Investment Pool), MCF hires managers who specialize in particular asset classes to ensure that there is superior performance and adequate diversification. Our goal is to benefit from a range of expertise from managers in a way that would be impractical and cost-prohibitive for individual investors.

Is there a minimum size for a fund?

There is no minimum, but the annual fee charged is 0.5% of the assets, with a minimum of $500.

What kind of assets can I contribute?

The Foundation can accept many types of assets including cash, publicly traded securities, closely held and restricted stock, real estate, and life insurance policies.

What are the costs involved in establishing a fund?

Establishing a fund at the Foundation is free of charge. The Foundation files the federal and state tax returns, provides an independent audit, processes disbursements, mails checks to recipients and grant reports to the donor, administers and invests the assets of the fund, and issues regular financial reports on the status of the fund to the donor.

Is the fund I establish permanent?

It is if you establish a fund as an endowment. It's your choice.

Can other people contribute to the fund I establish?

Yes.

 
Once You Establish a Fund

What should I do with my Fund Agreement?

Keep one signed original and return the other to the philanthropic planning staff at MCF who helped you establish your fund. Please call that contact person if you have any questions regarding the Fund Agreement.

Will I be getting any other documents?

After we receive your signed Fund Agreement, you will be sent a welcome binder containing information about the administration of your fund. The binder will serve as a convenient place for you to keep all future correspondence related to your fund.

Will my grant requests always be honored?

You may recommend grants to qualified nonprofit groups and government entities. To comply with applicable IRS regulations however, the Marin Community Foundation's Board of Trustees retains the final responsibility for approving distributions from funds. Grants are generally made to organizations recognized under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Are my grant recommendations limited to a certain amount?

Donor-advised funds are extremely flexible. Depending on how you set up the fund, you can recommend grants based on an overall percentage of the fund's fair market value (applying a spending rule) or a larger proportion of the fund's assets. Each grant recommendation must be at least $250.

Does the Foundation have a spending rule, and if so, how does that apply to the grants I recommend?

Yes, MCF has a spending rule for funds established as endowments. It does not apply to expendable funds. The spending rule, a formula that determines the amount of money available for grantmaking from endowments, is based on a designated percentage of the fund's fair market value. The Foundation's current spending policy distributes 5% of an average 12-quarter market value annually. Based on historic stock and bond market performance, this should allow the endowment fund to distribute grants in inflation-adjusted amounts in perpetuity.

What if I don't know who to make grants to or want to know who is doing the best job in my area of interest?

We have excellent staff and extensive research capabilities that are available to help you. For example, we can help you learn about nonprofit groups that work in your areas of interest or do customized research on issues you’re interested in. You may also learn about the groups already supported through MCF in the “Research a Group” section of MCF Donor Express. Or, contact Megan DeGraeve, director of philanthropic advisory services, at 415.464.2518 to discuss your interests and goals.

Can I get a refund of a gift made to the Foundation?

All contributions, once accepted by the Board of Trustees, represent an irrevocable contribution to the Marin Community Foundation and are not refundable. However, if you want to terminate your fund, simply recommend grants of the fund's entire balance, and then we will close the fund.

Can I make a grant to a private foundation?

To comply with IRS regulations, the Foundation cannot distribute grants to non-operating private foundations, even though they are 501(c)(3) organizations. However, grants may be made to private operating foundations (private foundations that use the bulk of their income to provide charitable services or to run charitable programs of their own).

 

Current Donors

 
General Information about Your Fund

What should I do with my Fund Agreement?

Keep one signed original and return the other to the philanthropic planning staff member at MCF who helped you establish your fund. Please call that person if you have any questions regarding the Fund Agreement or other aspects of how the fund is set up.

May I make changes to the Fund Agreement?

Yes, in most cases this can be done easily with a Fund Agreement Amendment, a document that reflects the intended language changes and is signed by you and the President and CEO of the Foundation.

Will I be getting any other documents after my fund is set up?

After we receive your signed Fund Agreement, you will be sent a welcome binder containing information about the administration of your fund, including how to recommend grants and make additional gifts into the fund. The binder will serve as a convenient place for you to keep all future correspondence and materials related to your fund.

How can I check the status of my fund?

The easiest way is to log on to MCF Donor Express, your personal online tool for managing the fund you have established. You may view your current fund balance, look at donor statements from previous quarters, make grant recommendations, and research nonprofit organizations. You will also receive a quarterly donor statement electronically — or, if you prefer — by mail for your reference.

What are my investment options?

To meet your philanthropic objectives, you may suggest that your fund's assets be invested in any proportion in six investment pools: an equity pool, a socially screened equity pool, a fixed income pool, a money market pool, an enhanced cash pool, and the Foundation's Loan Fund. For example, for no risk to principal, funds are generally invested solely in the money market pool. Endowed funds, which are intended to maintain purchasing power over time, typically allocate 75% of assets to either of the equity pools and 25% to the fixed income pool.

Within each pool (except the Marin Community Investment Pool), MCF hires managers who specialize in particular asset classes to ensure that there is superior performance and adequate diversification. Our goal is to benefit from a range of expertise from managers in a way that would be impractical and cost-prohibitive for individual investors.

How can I ensure my investment allocations will remain balanced?

The Foundation automatically rebalances your target allocations across investment pools whenever the allocation becomes out of balance by 5% or more from the target.

Who decides how my fund will be invested?

When you establish your fund you will discuss your philanthropic investment goals with the philanthropic planning staff, who will help you determine the appropriate asset mix for your fund's investments. Your quarterly donor statement will show the fund's performance, and you can always get your current fund balance online using MCF's Giving Center. Should you wish to discuss possible changes to the asset allocation strategy for the fund you have established, please contact your philanthropic advisor.

 
Recommending Grants through the Foundation

How do I recommend a grant from my fund?

You may recommend a grant online using MCF's Giving Center. Or you may download a grant recommendation form from the Foundation's website from this page and fax it to us at the Foundation at 415.464.2555. In addition, forms are provided in your welcome binder. You may duplicate these forms if you wish.

What is MCF's Giving Center and how do I access it?

The Giving Center is your personal online tool for managing the fund you established at the Marin Community Foundation.

To access the Giving Center, click here. Once on the Giving Center log-in page, enter your Username and Password, which can be found in your welcome binder.

If you do not have your Username and Password, would like to explore the features of the Giving Center, or have any other questions about using this tool, please contact Ebony Marshall at 415.464.2538 or by email.

To whom may I recommend a grant?

Grants may be recommended to organizations that are recognized by the IRS as tax-exempt, charitable organizations with 501(c)(3) status and that meet the Foundation's due diligence requirements.

May I make a grant to a specific individual?

Donor-advised funds may not make grants to individuals. Scholarship funds or funds that are advised by a committee may recommend a grant to support an individual only if that individual has been selected through an objective, predefined process and the grant is for a charitable purpose. An educational scholarship is the best example of this type of grant. In a case like this, we recommend the grant be made to the educational institution that the student will be attending.

Grants cannot be directed to specific individuals who are victims of a disaster or who have a personal illness. Support in these situations may be provided through non-profit groups that serve many people affected by disasters or illnesses.

In addition, no grant from a fund can benefit a relative of the donor.

May I recommend a grant through my fund to attend a charitable event?

According to IRS regulations, the cost of a ticket to such an event cannot be paid by your fund, even when only a portion of the ticket price is identified as tax-deductible and another portion as non-tax-deductible. Two examples illustrate this point:

a) If a charity's fundraising event is $250 per person, and the charity states that $100 is tax-deductible and $150 is non-tax-deductible, you may not divide the event support between a donor-advised fund and your personal check. You must pay the full $250 personally.

b) If you wish to sponsor a charity's event (at which individual tickets cost $200 per person) at a $5,000 level, you may recommend a grant of $5,000 from your donor-advised fund to support the charity and personally pay $200 per ticket to attend.

What if I am not going to attend the event but wish to support it by buying tickets?

You may support the event by recommending a general operating grant from a donor-advised fund so long as you do not attend the event.

May I pay for my membership dues to a museum, opera, symphony, public radio or television station, etc. through my donor-advised fund?

Generally a membership cannot be purchased through a donor-advised fund or other types of funds, because a member is considered someone who is entitled to certain rights and privileges in return for an annual contribution. (These include membership cards that entitle the donor to reduced or eliminated entrance fees and discounts on purchases.) However, general operating grants to a nonprofit are always allowed.

In general, one way to think about this is to ensure that you do not receive anything beyond what is considered "incidental benefits" as a result of your membership. Examples of incidental benefits are a t-shirt, coffee mug, or name recognition.

If I refuse a membership benefit can I make a grant for membership through my fund?

Yes, but only if you explicitly reject the benefit at the time the gift is made. You cannot choose to refuse the benefit after you already received it. In a case like this, we suggest that you recommend the grant for general operating support in order to avoid the appearance of conflict.

May I continue to make my annual membership contribution to my place of worship through my donor-advised fund?

You may continue to recommend grants for religious institution memberships, which are not affected by legislation or regulations.

However, you may not pay for religious school tuition through a grant from your donor-advised fund.

May I recommend a grant to nonprofits that engage in lobbying?

You can recommend grants to nonprofits registered with the IRS as 501(c)(3) organizations that engage in lobbying or the practice of advocating their clients' interests. However, the grant you recommend can only be for general operating support and not for specific lobbying activities.

Do you ever ask nonprofits to provide reports on the work that my fund is supporting?

There are instances where it makes sense to request a final report from an organization to which you are recommending a grant. Such instances would be when the grant is of a magnitude that is beyond the contribution size the organization typically receives, when the grant is related to a specific outcome you are interested in, or if there are specific activities the organization needs to complete in order to receive your contribution (such as the case of a challenge grant).

In a case like this we ask the nonprofit to sign a grant agreement prior to distributing the funds to ensure that they understand the conditions under which the grant is being made.

What is a challenge grant and how do I make one?

Challenge grants are grants offered to nonprofits to challenge them to raise matching monies. An example is when a donor offers a nonprofit a challenge grant of $50,000 and the nonprofit must raise $50,000 in order to receive the grant. We will enter the grant in our system but not complete processing it until the challenge has been met by the nonprofit. If you are interested in making a challenge grant, MCF staff will be happy to discuss the details with you.

May I make a pledge through my fund? What about a multi-year grant?

Although you may not fulfill an irrevocable personal pledge through your fund, you may recommend that the Foundation make a multi-year grant from your fund to a nonprofit organization or school. The assets to fulfill a multi-year grant must be segregated from the balance of the fund in order for the Foundation to be able to complete these kinds of grants. We will, however, leave these monies in the investment pool until such time as the grant payment comes due. Please talk to staff at the Foundation when you want to make this kind of grant so that we can help facilitate it.

May I make an anonymous grant?

Yes, you can make a grant anonymously at any time. In addition to requesting anonymity when establishing your fund (on the New Fund Worksheet), you can also indicate your preferences each time you recommend a grant. Both the name of your fund and your own name can remain anonymous to grant recipients and will not be published in MCF's public listings of grants.

May I recommend grants outside of Marin County?

Yes, you may recommend grants anywhere in the U.S. and internationally to support a charitable organization. Special due diligence is conducted for international grants (see question 23 below). If you are interested in receiving our International Grants Checklist, please contact Bonnie Grossman, grants manager, at 415.464.2571 or by email.

Please note there is a $2,500 minimum grant size for international grants. For all other grants the minimum is $250.

May I recommend grants to private foundations?

To comply with IRS regulations, the Foundation cannot distribute grants to non-operating private foundations, even though they are 501(c)(3) organizations. However, grants may be made to private operating foundations (private foundations that use the bulk of their income to provide charitable services or to run charitable programs of their own).

What are MCF's due diligence requirements?

Due diligence is the process MCF uses to ensure that organizations are qualified to receive grants and are capable of fulfilling your charitable intent. The due diligence review typically involves our receiving and reviewing the organization's current 501(c)(3) tax-exempt letter as well as financial and programmatic information.

Organizations other than religious institutions must also comply with the Foundation's nondiscrimination policy, which is:

"The Marin Community Foundation will not knowingly support organizations, projects, and programs that discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, medical condition, veteran status, economic status, marital status, disability, ancestry, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic protected by law. We therefore require that all grant applicants and recipients submit a signed Nondiscrimination Policy confirming compliance with the Foundation's policy and with all applicable local, state, and federal anti-discrimination laws."

For grants that are recommended outside the U.S., the Foundation may, if necessary, use the services of a third party to determine whether grantees are public charities (or their equivalent), comply with the U.S. government's anti-terrorist funding requirements, and follow all applicable domestic and international tax laws.

How long does it take to process a grant recommendation?

Grants to organizations MCF has supported in the past can be processed quickly, usually within five business days. Grants to organizations not yet supported through the Foundation may take longer to process (one to two weeks) to allow time for us to receive materials and ensure all the proper due diligence is completed before making the grant. Note: for grants over $10,000 the distribution may be delayed so that the Foundation can redeem assets held in MCF’s investment pools. Redemptions from our investment pools occur at the end of each month; therefore, the check will be issued on the first of the month following the date when the grant recommendation is submitted.

Can you send me the grant check so I can deliver it to the nonprofit?

The Foundation sends checks directly to grantee organizations. You will, however, receive a copy of the letter that accompanies the check so you will know when it was sent.

What is the minimum grant amount?

The minimum grant amount is $250 to U.S. based nonprofits. The minimum for grants made internationally is $2,500.

Does the Foundation have a spending rule, and if so, how does that apply to the grants I recommend?

Yes, MCF has a spending rule for funds established as endowments. It does not apply to expendable funds. The spending rule is a formula that determines the amount of money available for grantmaking from endowments and is based on a designated percentage of the fund's fair market value. The Foundation's current spending policy distributes annually 5% of an average 12-quarter market value. Based on historic stock and bond market performance, this should allow the endowment fund to distribute grants in inflation-adjusted amounts in perpetuity.

What if I don't know who to make grants to or want to know who is doing the best job in my area of interest?

We have excellent staff and extensive research capabilities that are available to help you. For example, we can help you learn about nonprofit groups that work in your areas of interest or do customized research on issues that interest you. You may also learn about the groups already supported through MCF in the "Research Nonprofits" section of MCF's Giving Center. Or, contact Megan DeGraeve, director of philanthropic advisory services, at 415.464.2518 to discuss your interests and goals.

 
Gifting Assets to the Foundation

Can a donor get a refund of a gift made to the Foundation?

All contributions, once accepted by the Board of Trustees, are an irrevocable contribution to the Marin Community Foundation and are not refundable. However, if you want to terminate your fund, simply recommend grants of the fund's entire balance, and we will then close the fund. Should you move to another community, if you like, we can facilitate moving your fund to the community foundation in your new area.

How do I gift publicly traded securities?

Please contact Lizzie Cairns, senior accountant, at 415.464.2514 or by email each time you wish to gift securities. She will provide you with current account information for stock transfers. This will ensure that your contribution is credited to the correct fund in a timely fashion.

Charities are not permitted to value non-cash gifts, such as artwork and real estate. It is the responsibility of the donor to obtain an independent, professional valuation.

May I give anything besides cash and publicly traded securities? How?

Yes. You may give real estate, closely held stock, an interest in a family business, and many other assets. All such gifts are reviewed individually. We will talk with you about the details of your proposed gift and the appropriate procedure for transferring the asset. We do not accept vehicles or livestock.

If I am giving cash, how do I make out my check?

Checks should be made out to Marin Community Foundation with a note in the memo section as to which fund it is for-e.g., the XYZ Fund. Or, send a cover note indicating the name of the fund to which the contribution should be credited.

What information will be on my receipt?

In all cases the receipt will show the date the gift was received. If the contribution was a check, the dollar amount and check number will also be shown.

If the gift was in the form of securities, the receipt will list the date the securities transferred and the number of shares. We also provide the value of the stock at the time it was received into our account (or the date the physical stock was delivered to MCF). The value is based on the high and low average for the day of the stock multiplied by the number of shares, with appropriate disclaimers.

Receipts for real estate and other non-cash gifts identify the property transferred. The IRS may require you to obtain an appraisal and to file a Form 8283 with your income tax return. We can provide you a Form 8283 on request.

How long does it take to process a gift to my fund?

Most gifts are processed within 72 hours or sooner after receiving them. Publicly traded securities are typically sold upon receipt unless special circumstances dictate that MCF holds the stock for a period of time. Once sold, the proceeds are reinvested in MCF's investment pools in accordance with the donor's choices. Of course, the processing time for real estate, non-publicly traded securities, and other unique gifts will take longer, depending on the nature of the gift and the liquidation plan.

Can I make a gift to my fund through my estate?

Yes, your fund can be named as a beneficiary of your estate to fulfill your charitable goals. If you would like to discuss this further, please contact Alexandra Derby at 415.464.2517 or by email.

How do I transfer assets to my fund at MCF from my commercial donor-advised fund (e.g., the Schwab Charitable Gift Fund or Fidelity's donor-advised fund program)?

Simply recommend a grant of any or all the assets in the commercial fund to MCF to be added to the donor-advised fund.

May I make a gift to my fund from my private foundation?

Yes, these contributions are allowed and at this time do count toward the 5% minimum distribution requirement for private foundations. We suggest that you consult with your legal counsel when making a grant from a private foundation.

Professional Advisors

 
General Questions

Do I need a password to use the Planned Giving Design Center website?

No. You can sign up as a member, but most information is available free at www.pgdc.com.

Whom can I contact if I have problems with the site?

Contact Brain Van Weele at 415.464.2515 or by email.

Why shouldn't my client give directly to the organization(s) they wish to support?

When your clients give to their favorite organizations through the Foundation, they're able to recommend contributions on their timeframe and have the flexibility of supporting any charitable organization they wish. Additionally, the Foundation handles all of the administration, record keeping, and financial statements.

Through the Marin community Foundation, your client's giving is made simple. The Foundation is also equipped to accept a wide variety of assets, from cash and securities to real property and closely held stock. Another benefit of using the Marin Community foundation for your clients' charitable giving activities is timeliness. with a donor-advised fund, for example, a donor receives an immediate tax credit for his or her contribution, but retains the ability to recommend grants to nonprofit organizations at a later time.

What are the tax benefits for my clients if they give through the Marin Community Foundation?

As a community foundation, MCF offers the maximum charitable tax advantaged available by law. Because the Foundation is a community foundation, it is not subject to the taxes and regulations affecting private foundations, and it has greater flexibility on matters such as minimum payout.

How much control and freedom would my client have in recommending gift recipients?

Your client can recommend a grant to any organization that falls within the broad philanthropic mission of the Foundation and is qualified as a public charity under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The United States has over 650,000 IRS-approved charities. The Foundation will ensure that groups recommended for a grant meet this requirement.

In complying with federal tax laws, and for the protection of your client, the Foundation must reject grant recommendations that would benefit an individual, fulfill a personal obligation, support a political campaign, or that is for a private foundation.

How does a donor-advised fund work?

Your client can establish a donor-advised fund without a minimum opening gift. At that time, your client will receive a tax deduction. Your client then recommends how the fund should be invested, choosing between one of our four investment options, or a combination. Your client then recommends grants when they would like to support a particular group.

Can my client name a successor to the fund?

Yes, your client can name a successor or successors to the fund. If they do not name a successor, or after the successor's death, the Foundation's Board of Trustees will continue to use the funds in accordance with your client's wishes.

How do MCF's costs compare with those of commercial gift funds and private foundations?

With a 0.5% annual fee (with a minimum of $500), the Foundation's fees are highly competitive with commercial gift funds. But even more important, the Foundation offers your clients unique value that can come from our staff's knowledge of the community and expertise in the philanthropic field.

Opening a fund at MCF is considerably less expensive than starting a private foundation, since we handle all administrative details, including filing annual tax returns, performing due diligence on grants, and all details associated with processing and tracking grants.

Can charitable funds established at the Marin Community Foundation benefit areas other than Marin County?

Our role is to help donors create funds that carry out their charitable goals, be that in Marin or elsewhere. Foundation donors have the ability to recommend grants to organizations around the world.

What is the minimum gift required to start a fund?

There is no minimum amount required to start a fund at the Foundation. However, there is an annual administrative fee of 0.5% of the fund's assets, with a minimum of $500.

What type of assets can my client use to start a fund?

The Marin Community Foundation has the ability to accept a range of assets, including:

  • Cash
  • Stocks and bonds
  • Real estate
  • Personal property, such as jewelry and artwork
  • Life insurance policies

Can I receive CE credits through the Foundation?

Yes, the Foundation regularly offers workshops for which professionals can receive credit.

Grantees

 
General Questions

How can I get money from the Marin Community Foundation if I have a personal dire need?

MCF does not make grants or loans to individuals. As a community foundation, we serve charitable and educational needs addressed by tax-exempt organizations.

How do I know if I am eligible for a grant from the Marin Community Foundation?

We make most of our grants to tax-exempt agencies classified as 501(c)(3) organizations, public charities as defined by the Internal Revenue Service. We also make some grants to governmental agencies. The Foundation's discretionary grants are made to organizations that benefit the residents of Marin County, California. Whereas most of these groups are based in Marin, they do not have to be, as long as the activities and services benefit Marin County residents. We look for creative programs designed to meet community needs, address public policy issues, or test new ideas.

Can I receive a grant from a donor-advised fund?

Advisors to donor-advised funds recommend grants to nonprofit organizations based on their areas of interest. Individual organizations are not able to request support directly from these funds.

Can you refer me to anyone else for funding?

A good resource for both individuals and organizations is The Foundation Center. They do not provide funding themselves, but are well equipped to provide online and library-based resources to help grantseekers identify appropriate funders and develop targeted proposals. They have five locations throughout the country, including one in San Francisco. In addition, the Center for Volunteer and Nonprofit Leadership in Marin houses considerable information on sources of funding for nonprofit groups.

Loans

 
General Questions

Our organization thinks it may need a loan in the future. At what point in our planning process should we contact the Loan fund for a loan?

Since the Loan Fund's turnaround time is three to four months, we recommend that you contact us at least 4 months before the time you will need funds. We highly recommend “shopping” your loan around to different lenders, both commercial and nonprofit, so that you know the different financing options open to you and that you can get the best possible interest rate and terms for your organization.

Our organization does not have audited financial statements. Can we still apply for a loan?

The Loan Fund prefers that organizations applying for a loan have audited or compiled financial statements. However, we will accept an organization's 990 forms if that are all that is available.

Can our organization apply for a loan if we already receive grant funding from MCF?

Yes, the Loan Fund accepts applications from organizations that are already MCF grantees.

What fees should our organization expect if we apply for and receive a loan from MCF?

The Marin Community Foundation does not charge any application, commitment, or origination fees to loan applicants in order to enable organizations to put as much money as possible towards their projects. In addition, MCF will cover its own legal fees incurred in the loan closing process. Borrowers should be prepared to pay for their own legal costs incurred during the loan closing process as well as all title and escrow related costs.

I am a resident of Marin County? Am I eligible to apply for a loan from the Marin Community Foundation Loan Fund?

The Loan Fund makes loans only to nonprofit groups in Marin County. It does not make loans to individuals.

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Recommended Links

Below are links to a variety of resources related to charitable giving and the work of nonprofits.

Information on Nonprofits

Information on Planned Giving

Blogs About Philanthropy