For a group of volunteers, planting a hillside with native plants is an act of dedication and perseverance. On a cold December day, they planted seedlings grown from seeds they had collected two years earlier.  Read more

Learn more about restoring ecosystems

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Find out about the results of our grantmaking

MCF Strategic Plan:

Restoring Ecosystems

Marin County has an abundance of open space and protected natural areas, including wetlands, streams, estuaries, native old growth and oak woodland forests, and grasslands. However, many of Marin County's treasured ecosystems and natural habitats suffer from the proliferation of exotic and invasive plants and animals or from simply being neglected due to limited funding and staffing.

In addition, Marin is home to some of the world's most unique ecosystems—such as rare coastal wetlands and shoreline habitats that support a diversity of birds, a number of which are listed as endangered or threatened. These areas are also home to many native and sometimes threatened species. Without careful management, the ecological health of these valuable and unique natural assets is at risk.

Strategy: Promote coordinated, effective, science-based restoration and monitoring in Marin County

MCF is addressing two key issues within this goal area: training and continuing education to restoration and monitoring practitioners, and coordinating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of restoration and monitoring projects.

While there are scores of restoration and monitoring efforts underway within Marin County, the quality and effectiveness of those efforts varies due to the knowledge, capacity, and expertise of practitioners, thus reducing their overall impact of their efforts. MCF is funding education efforts for conservation staff, land managers, and volunteers and efforts to collect and distribute best practices and innovative techniques for restoration and monitoring.

There is limited coordination of land management and restoration activities across specific sites, species of concern, and critical habitats, since they are typically are under the jurisdiction of multiple agencies and landowners. MCF is providing funds for planning and coordinating restoration goals, piloting innovative restoration and monitoring techniques, evaluating restoration and monitoring projects, and disseminating findings and recommendations.

Grants made since the implementation of MCF’s Strategic Plan:

Grants
Organization Description Awarded Amount
Audubon Canyon Ranch To support the Four Canyons Restoration and Early Detection Project. $50,000.00
Audubon Canyon Ranch To support training, regional coordination, and local action to protect Marin ecosystems. $50,000.00
Audubon Society To expand salt marsh habitats and restore native plant communities in Richardson Bay. $40,000.00
Audubon Society To expand salt marsh habitats and restore native plant communities in Richardson Bay. $40,000.00
Audubon Society To Restoring Marsh Habitat in Richardson Bay. $35,000.00
The Bay Institute of San Francisco To support aquatic restoration projects that preserve and restore the unique ecosystem values through an education program that involves Marin youth. $70,000.00
Bay Institute of San Francisco To support climate change monitoring. $60,000.00
Bay Institute of San Francisco To support STRAW: Restoration Science Project for Marin Students and Teachers. $60,000.00
Conservation Corps North Bay To support an exotic species removal project at Angel Island and China Camp State Parks. $50,000.00
Conservation Corps North Bay To support the Natural Resource Crews Program. $70,000.00
Conservation Corps North Bay To support the Natural Resource Crews Program. $55,000.00
Conservation Corps North Bay To support the Restoration & Ecosystems Management Program. $40,000.00
Conservation Corps North Bay To support the Volunteers in Service to the Environment, Restoration & Ecosystem Management program. $40,000.00
Inverness Foundation To support pampas grass eradication in Inverness and West Marin. $10,000.00
Marin Agricultural Land Trust To support the restoration project. $25,000.00
Marin Audubon Society To support the marsh project. $15,000.00
Marin County Resource Conservation District To implement habitat improvement projects on sites within the Tomales Bay, Lagunitas, and Walker Creek watersheds. $60,000.00
Point Reyes National Seashore To support the restoration project. $20,000.00
PRBO Conservation Science To support collaboration with University of California Cooperative Extension staff to develop and publish the Technical Riparian Restoration and Management Guide. $35,000.00
PRBO Conservation Science To support Landowner Report Card for Evaluating Riparian Restoration Projects. $30,000.00
PRBO Conservation Science To support the Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed program. $50,000.00
PRBO Conservation Science To support the Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed program. $20,000.00
Regents of the University of California To support Trends in Stream Restoration Success. $35,000.00
San Francisco Zen Center To develop a design for the restoration of lower Green Gulch Creek as part of a long-term plan to fully restore the Green Gulch creek and watershed. $25,000.00
Save the Bay To support the community-based restoration at Bothin Marsh. $20,000.00
Save the Bay To support the restoration project. $15,000.00
Tomales Bay Watershed Council Foundation To support the Chicken Ranch Beach Restoration Project. $25,000.00
Tomales Bay Watershed Council Foundation To support the Chicken Ranch Beach-3rd Valley Creek Project-Phase 2. $25,000.00
Turtle Island Restoration Network To support CREATES (Coho Resilience, Ecological Awareness, & Training in Environmental Sustainability). $50,000.00
Turtle Island Restoration Network To support CREATES (Coho Resilience, Ecological Awareness, &Training in Environmental Sustainability). $45,000.00
Total Restoring Ecosystems Grants: $1,165,000.00